3.4
1 reviews
68

Intel X25-M Mainstream


$300.00 Released September, 2008

Product Shot 1 The Pros:Fastest consumer SSD - best random small file reads/writes. Affordable for enthusiasts. Many times the speed of mechanical drives - saves time, money, battery life, sanity.

The Cons:Not quite affordable for the majority of consumers. Past few firmware updates have been rocky, have been pulled after release for bricking drives. Firmware isn't updated as often as competing drives.

The Intel X25-M Mainstream is an MLC-based, 2.5” solid-state disk drive geared toward regular laptop/desktop PCs. It utilizes 34nm NAND flash memory lithography to deliver a 250MB/sec sustained read rate and 70MB/sec write speed.

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And unlike a conventional hard-disc drive, the X25-M can handle a greater workload with less space, zero cooling, and bare-minimum power consumption. It is in fact very similar to the 50nm SSDs on the market, save that it’s more compact, delivers improved latency, and much superior Input/Output Operations Per Second (IOPS). According to reports, the X-25M Mainstream is equipped to deliver up to 66000 4KB write IOPS and 35000 read IOPS. This not only blows away traditional HDDs, but sets the bar higher for SSDs as well.

Features

  • MLC-Based SSD
  • NAND Technology
  • Zero Cooling
  • Energy Efficient

Specifications

  • Model Name: Intel X25-M Mainstream SATA Solid-State Drive
  • Capacity: 80/160GB
  • NAND Flash: 10 Parallel Channel Architecture w/34nm MLC ONFI 1.0
  • Bandwidth (Write): Sequential up to 250MB/s
  • Bandwidth (Read): Sequential up to 70MB/s
  • Ready Latency: 85 microseconds
  • Interface: SATA I/II

User Reviews (3)

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Add Pros & Cons
68
ProScore
Pros
  • 2

    fastest consumer SSD - best random small file reads/writes

  • 2

    affordable for enthusiasts

  • 2

    many times the speed of mechanical drives - saves time, money, battery life, sanity

  • 2

    low power consumption compared to mechanical drives - improves battery life / power draw

  • 2

    not susceptible to physical damage from shock

  • 2

    compatible size and interface - fits into any SATA compatible laptop, desktop

  • 2

    3-year warranty

  • 1

    fair capacities

  • 1

    runs cool

  • 1

    34nm flash

  • 1

    less expensive than the first generation - leading the price/performance pack

  • 1

    getting cheaper every day - down to $215 (late April 2010)

  • 1

    TRIM support

Cons
  • 2

    not quite affordable for the majority of consumers

  • 2

    past few firmware updates have been rocky, have been pulled after release for bricking drives

  • 1

    firmware isn't updated as often as competing drives

  • 1

    capacities cannot compete with mechanical drive alternatives

  • 1

    data cannot be recovered if a component is damaged - unlike on mechanical drives (if you have the money)

  • 1

    second generation offering is actually slower in key benchmarks compared to the first - slower to boot up OS, applications

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